Business

Woman on TikTok claiming employer wants her to change her hair color has users sounding off

A woman on TikTok has gone viral for calling out an employer that has reportedly asked her to change her hair color.

The TikTok user, who goes the username Shugga.Shugga, and is said to be 24 years old and from Dallas, Texas, according to her social media bio, doesn’t have any plans to dye her pink hair.

In the 23-second video posted on Wednesday, April 19, the user expressed her annoyance with various expletives and suggested that the national unemployment rate is high because employers have concerns about employee appearances.

WOMAN’S LINKEDIN HEADSHOT GOES VIRAL FOR SHOWING OFF TATTOOS

“My hair ain’t going do the work,” she said in her video, which has been viewed more than 431,300 times.

Distress woman with short pink hair stops to think in public space.

A woman with pink hair created and shared a TikTok video about how she’s refusing to change her hair color. (iStock / iStock)

Shugga.Shugga also captioned the video with: “NO IM NOT CHANGING MY HAIR.”

FOX Business reached out to Shugga.Shugga for comment.

The TikTok video generated over 67,800 likes and over 1,670 comments as of Tuesday.

It appears that nearly all commenters under Shugga’s post are supportive of her stance.

“Be glad they showed their true colors, you don’t need to be working there anyway sis. Red flag,” one commenter wrote.

“It’s such an odd thing, why do people think hair color has to do with work ethic?” another commenter questioned. “It’s just self-expression.”

PERMANENT BRACELETS: THE TREND THAT’LL GIVE THE ‘THRILL’ OF A TATTOO ‘WITHOUT THE PAIN’ 

“In reality they need to be hiring people who do color their hair or have tattoos and or piercings [to be honest],” another user reasoned. “You gotta have dedication to all the things.”

Many commenters under the post shared that they’ve had similar experiences, and that the companies that usually had strict appearance conditions for employment were in the service industry, including retail stores and fast food restaurants.

Female dog groomer with blue hair cradles a poodle in her arms.

Several TikTok users have shared stories of how they have had hard times finding jobs that accept their non-traditional hair colors. (iStock / iStock)

One TikTok user left a surprising comment claiming to have worked in multiple hair salons where professional hair stylists weren’t allowed to have “fashion colors” – a hairstyling term used to describe temporary hair dyes that are in unnatural shades. 

Other commenters noted that they’ve been asked to change their appearance for hourly jobs.

“I was told my locs r to [sic] long. Shoulder length or shorter.,” one commenter wrote. “I’m not cutting my hair for minimum wage.”

PAID TIME OFF: 3 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD USE ALL YOUR PTO

“I had a McDonald’s tell me I couldn’t have red hair, tattoos, or piercings. They were paying $12 max,” another commenter shared.

Some TikTok users expressed that they don’t see why they should have to change their appearance or be prohibited from pursuing a fashion-focused body modification for certain jobs.

“I had a black and red split dye and my job said I had to have an all natural color, ma’am I drug test criminals,” one TikTok user wrote.

Lifestyle portrait of smiling stylish woman with wavy red and black hair dyed in an even split.

Many TikTok users have commented that they like to dye their hair in non-traditional hair colors because they view it as a form of self-expression, much like fashion. (iStock / iStock)

“We’re not allowed to have tattoos or piercings either… all I’m doing is serving popcorn,” another user wrote.

“I told the hiring manager if they weren’t paying for the color correction and new dyes then I wasn’t doing it,” another user shared. “They didn’t like that.”

BODY ART AND TATTOOS IN THE WORKPLACE 

A few TikTok commenters noted that they’ve successfully found employers who allow untraditional hair colors and body art.

“Thankful to have my job where I have tons of tattoos and crazy color hair and they love me because I do my job,” one user wrote.

“I work for a hospital and they [don’t care] about hair color, piercings or tattoos as long as it’s not offensive,” another user wrote. “I love it.”

Unrecognizable multi ethnic business team holding their hands together. Modern business team holding hands like successful team.

Tattoos, piercings and other forms of elective body modification aren’t protected by anti-discrimination laws. (iStock / iStock)

Current hiring discrimination laws in the United States protect job applicants and employees from being discriminated against on the basis of age, race or national origin, sex or gender, disability and pregnancy, according to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

However, there are no federal discrimination laws that stop private employers from banning unnatural hair colors, visible face or body piercings, visible tattoos and other forms of visible body art. 

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

While some states may have expanded discrimination laws that offer additional appearance-based protections for protected classes – such as the multistate-adopted CROWN Act, which is designed to prohibit race-based hair discrimination, or New York Senate Bill S4037, which prohibits religious-based facial hair discrimination – employers are still allowed to instate and enforce grooming policies, according to the U.S Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s CM-619 Grooming Standards.

A 2019 report published by the global staffing firm Accountemps found that workplaces are becoming laxer in terms of employee styling.

The staffing agency’s report included a workforce survey that consulted 2,800 senior managers at companies that had 20 or more employees in 28 major U.S. cities to see which behaviors and styles team leaders have deemed to be “acceptable.”

Accountemps' 2019 "Office Etiquette Survey: Bad Language, Pets, Political Décor Remain Biggest Offenses."

According to a 2019 Accountemps survey, about one-third of companies see no problem with employees donning non-traditional hair colors (34%), visible tattoos (35%) and casual attire (34%). (Accountemps / Fox News)

In terms of non-traditional hair colors, 34% of senior managers say vibrant rainbow-like colors were once “problematic” but are now acceptable. Nearly a quarter of senior managers – 23% – disagreed and said non-traditional hair colors were and continue to be unacceptable.

About one-third of senior managers said non-traditional piercings (33%), visible tattoos (35%) and casual attire (34%) are acceptable in most modern workplaces.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

Less than a quarter of the surveyed senior managers disagreed on the acceptability of visible tattoos and casual attire with 22% having said visible tattoos are unacceptable in workplaces and 16% having said casual attire is unacceptable in workplaces.

Nearly three in 10 senior managers – 29% – said they find non-traditional piercings to be unacceptable at work.

Related posts

Target employee confronts, stops thieves at New Jersey store

Patti Jo

Wholesale inflation jumps to highest level since April 2023

A top goal of Americans is to buy a new car, build emergency savings: study

Leave a Comment